Prayer Tip #58: Praying for Real Needs

[From Lauris Shepherd, one of our Elders]

It’s always good to praise the Lord, but it is particularly critical to do so when I don’t feel like it.  It helps me get my focus off of myself and/or the circumstances and back on Jesus and the fact that He is faithful and mighty to save.

When people share a need or we observe people in need and we want to intercede for them, our tendency is to pray our sympathies.  This approach often has us praying about symptoms without addressing root issues and real needs.  I think we would all agree that to pray, “Lord, help my friend feel better.” will not have a very deep or lasting impact.

In Mark 2 friends brought a paralytic to Jesus to be healed and Jesus said, “Son, your sins are forgiven you.”  The paralyzed man had a need much more critical and with greater consequences than physical healing.

In Luke 18 (also Matt. 19 and Mark 10) a rich young ruler asked Jesus how to receive eternal life.  How would you have counseled/prayed for this man?  Jesus told him to keep the commandments. (What happened to ‘believe on Me and be saved’?  Jesus hadn’t been through our evangelism class.)  He knew the good man was trusting in his good works, so He told him if he really wanted to grow he should sell all his possessions and give to the poor and then come and follow Jesus.  The man couldn’t trust Jesus for salvation while trusting in his riches.

In John 5 Jesus picked a man out of a crowd of sufferers who had been an invalid for 38 years and asked him, “Do you want to be made well?”  The obvious is not always the greatest need.

When interceding, pause to think about what the real needs might be, asking God for discernment and just what you should pray.  Then pray in the Spirit.


For more information on the GBC Prayer Team, visit begrace.org/ministries/prayer-team.
For more information on GBC, visit begrace.org.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s